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Charles Montaldo

Finally, Justice for Officer Mark MacPhail

By September 21, 2011

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After 22 years and numerous frustrating delays, including a lengthy one on the final day, the family of Savannah police officer Mark Allen MacPhail finally received justice. Convicted cop killer Troy Anthony Davis was executed today by lethal injection at the Georgia Diagnostic Prison in Jackson.

Davis, who was convicted in 1991 for the Aug. 19, 1989 shooting death of MacPhail, was pronounced dead at 11:08 p.m.

Davis' execution came at the end of a day of desperate appeals by his attorneys, all of which were rejected. Davis had previously exhausted all of his legal appeals when the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his last effort on March 28.

Last-Minute Appeals Rejected

When the day began, his attorneys attempted to have Davis take a polygraph test to "prove his innocence," but the Department of Corrections would not allow the death row inmate's final day routine to be interrupted.

The Georgia Board of Pardon and Paroles, which denied Davis clemency for the second time on Tuesday, today told his attorneys they would not consider any further appeals.

Late in the afternoon, Butts County Superior Court Judge Thomas Wilson declined to issue a stay, rejecting Davis' last-minute effort to halt his execution. The state Attorney General opposed the stay, saying it was only a delaying tactic since all of Davis' appeals had been exhausted.

Then the Georgia State Supreme Court voted unanimously to reject the Davis appeal. As the scheduled 7 p.m. execution time approached, prison officials delayed proceedings to await a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court.

After a delay of more than three hours, the U.S. Supreme Court issued an order denying Davis' appeal for a stay of execution.

Thousands Deceived by 'Smoke and Mirrors'

Thousands of Troy Davis supporters opposed his execution because they believe the reports that seven of nine state witnesses at his 1991 trial have since recanted their testimony. Those supporters, and the journalists who have blindly repeated those claims, might be enlightened by reading the actual court record of the case and the details of those so-called recantations.

On Aug. 24, 2010, U.S. District Judge William T. Moore Jr. issued a 172-page ruling after earlier conducting an extraordinary hearing in federal court to receive testimony and make findings of fact as to Davis' actual innocence, a hearing ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Entire Case Record Reviewed

In his 172-page report, Judge Moore reviewed the entire 20-year case record - from the initial police interviews with witnesses, to the testimony of those witnesses at the 1991 trial and finally the statements of those witnesses at the 2010 hearing in federal district court.

Judge Moore painstakingly compared the so-called recantation testimony of the seven witnesses with their previous statements to police and in court and to the testimony from other credible witnesses.

Those who read the full court report will get a better understanding why Judge Moore called Davis' claim of innocence "smoke and mirrors." Judge Moore said the claim that seven witnesses had recanted their testimony "vastly overstates" the actual evidence presented at the hearing.

Summary of the So-Called Recantations

According to Judge Moore's summary of the evidence:

  • Two of the recanting witnesses neither directly state that they lied at trial nor claim that their previous testimony was coerced.
  • Two other recantations were impossible to believe, with a host of intrinsic reasons why they could not be trusted, and the recantations were contradicted by credible, live testimony.
  • Two more recantations were intentionally and suspiciously offered in affidavit form rather than as live testimony, blocking any meaningful cross-examination by the state or credibility determination by this Court.
  • While these latter two recantations are not totally valueless, Judge Moore wrote, their import is greatly diminished by the suspicious way in which they were offered and the live, contrary testimony.
McQueen Wasn't Believable at Trial

Judge Moore did rule that one of the recantations was credible - that of jailhouse snitch Kevin McQueen, who admitted that his testimony at Davis' trial was "complete fabrication."

But Judge Moore said, McQueen's testimony at trial was so patently false and filled with inconsistencies with other witnesses in the case it is "hard to believe" his testimony was important to the conviction.

Therefore, Judge Moore said although McQueen's recantation was credible, it was of limited value.

Forgotten Memories, Partial Changes

Two of the so-called recantations were not recantations at all, but witnesses saying 20 years later they no longer recall all of the details of the night officer MacPhail was shot.

Some of the recantations were only partial recantations, in which the witnesses changed minor details, but those details were contrary to other credible, live witnesses.

Two of the recantations were given by close friends of Davis who were obviously lying to help their friend, Judge Moore ruled, because their original statements were backed up by "an overwhelming body of evidence."

Not Credible Recantations

Judge Moore said two of the witnesses were waiting right outside the hearing and could have been called to testify live, but Davis did not call them, Moore said, because they would not have stood up under cross examination. He offered their affidavits instead, which do not carry the weight of live, cross-examinable testimony.

Finally, Judge Moore ruled that "four of Davis's recantations do not diminish the State's case because a reasonable juror would disregard the recantation, not the earlier testimony; and the three others only minimally diminish the State's case."

Could Have Called Red Coles

At the hearing, Davis claimed that it was Sylvester "Red" Coles who shot MacPhail and he presented witnesses that said Coles had confessed to the crime. But under the hearing rules, the burden of proof was on Davis to prove Coles was guilty, unlike in a regular criminal trial where the state has the burden.

Judge Moore said Davis could have called Coles as a witness to ask him about his confessions and about the events of Aug. 19, 1989. But Davis did not attempt to subpoena prior to the close of the hearing.

Judge Moore wrote: "... the Court would have ordered the United States Marshall Service to serve Mr. Coles. Davis never made such a request, instead choosing to attempt selfservice at the eleventh hour. His half-hearted efforts belie his true intentions: to be able to say that he "attempted" to provide Mr. Coles' testimony when, in fact, he never intended to do so."

Reasonable Jurors Would Still Convict

In his ruling, Judge Moore said he believed the jury would not have been persuaded by any of the evidence presented by Davis at the federal hearing.

"After careful consideration and an in-depth review of 20 years of evidence, the Court is left with the firm conviction that while the State's case may not be ironclad, most reasonable jurors would again vote to convict Davis of Officer MacPhail's murder," he wrote.

"A federal court simply cannot interpose itself and set aside the jury verdict in this case absent a truly persuasive showing of innocence," he said. "To act contrarily would wreck complete havoc on the criminal justice system."

Davis is not innocent, Judge Moore concluded.

Background:
The Shooting of Officer Mark MacPhail
The Appeals of Troy Davis

Forum:
Discuss The Troy Davis Case

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Photo: Savannah Police Dept.

Comments

September 22, 2011 at 12:02 am
(1) thestray says:

“Justice”? Guilty or innocent it sickens me that murder is what is what passes for “justice” in this country. There should be no death penalty, our justice system is just too flawed and corrupt to decide whether someone lives or dies.

September 22, 2011 at 12:19 am
(2) Istimiel says:

I agree. No justice system is infallible, regardless of the evidence presented. I feel relief that I can live in a country like Australia where the death penalty has been abolished, because I honestly believe that ANY loss of life is a waste. If he truly was guilty then fine, he could’ve been locked away for the rest of his life. If he was innocent, there’s now two meaningless deaths, a guilty man walking free somewhere and no second chances.

September 22, 2011 at 12:23 am
(3) avitazem says:

the stray you state “Justice”? Guilty or innocent it sickens me that murder is what is what passes for “justice” in this country. There should be no death penalty, our justice system is just too flawed and corrupt to decide whether someone lives or dies.”

My response to you is do you feel the same about the FIFTY MILLION BABIES ABORTED WHO ACTUALLY ARE INNOCENT? Or is that only your feeling towards convicted murderers who shoot people in the face?

Bleeding heart liberals remind me of the crazed mob who cried for the release of the convicted murderer Barabas instead of JESUS CHRIST who was innocent. 2000 years later and still they are mentally dysfunctional.

September 22, 2011 at 12:27 am
(4) Vicki says:

There you go. Never miss an opportunity for the right wing fanatical RIGHT TO LIFERS to revel in someone else’s death.

Way to prove your point

September 22, 2011 at 12:34 am
(5) Vicki says:

And I might remind you, that us “bleeding heart liberals” are the only ones willing to be taxed to pay for these millions of babies you only care about until they actually breathe air! Where are you then?

September 22, 2011 at 12:55 am
(6) thestray says:

Um… why are you bringing abortion into this? Did I mention anything about abortion? Did anyone else? Did I say I was liberal? You don’t know me, you don’t know my political leanings or my opinions on anything else but this individual matter (which you still apparently don’t fully understand). If you want to rant about abortion go take that to a discussion about abortion.

What you fail to understand is that I have no sympathy whatsoever for convicted murderers. If they are guilty I hope they burn in hell. They are the scum of the earth.
That being said… WE. CAN’T. TRUST. OUR. JUSTICE. SYSTEM. TO. KILL. THESE. PEOPLE. What don’t you get about that? I don’t want to spare murderers you idiot, I want to spare INNOCENT people who may be wrongly convicted. Our justice system is not infallible, anyone who believes otherwise is delusional. It’s fallible because humans are fallible.

It’s a FACT that there have been people convicted for murder and then later exonerated. I think the number in America is about 140, you can look it up for yourself and check if that figure is correct. Do you really trust a justice system that has PROVEN it can make mistakes… to put people to DEATH? It’s unconscionable, period.

Imagine YOU are sitting on death row for something you didn’t do. How would you feel about the death penalty then?

September 23, 2011 at 4:49 pm
(7) cuffem917 says:

THANK YOU! Typical liberals fight for abortion, but capital punishment is wrong!? Double standard!

September 22, 2011 at 2:35 am
(8) tfromdet says:

I completely agree with you “thestray”. There is no justice when instead of one innocent man being murdered there has to be two. Unless you are God it is a sin to destroy what he has created in his own image.

September 22, 2011 at 12:16 am
(9) Vicki says:

For this to bring “closure” and “justice” to this family makes them a serious part of the problem. If there was even a shadow of a doubt, this man should not have died. 22 years in prison was not enough for the family? Well leave him in there for life. But to say justice was only served by murdering yet another human being makes them only seem blood thirsty.

September 22, 2011 at 3:27 am
(10) Josh says:

If that was your father who was killed, 22 years would not be enough for you.

September 22, 2011 at 9:13 am
(11) thestray says:

Not everyone who suffers a loss becomes bloodthirsty. Trust me.

September 22, 2011 at 9:50 am
(12) Whitney says:

I respectfully disagree. For those truly seeking justice and not vengeance, 22+ years is enough. You’re right. I and many others protesting Troy Davis’ death have not experienced the murder of loved one. BUT Ms.Barbara Anderson Young the sister of James C. Anderson, a man brutally murdered by white teenagers because they wanted to hurt a black person, has.

Like the MacPhail family, the Anderson’s suffered the needless loss of good man who was someone’s father, partner, brother and uncle. Unlike the MacPhail, they are not willing to see the accused pay with their lives, despite SOLID evidence. His sister wrote to the district attorney asking him NOT to seek the death penalty for his murder. Here’s an excerpt:

“Those responsible for James’ death not only ended the life of a talented and wonderful man. They also have caused our family unspeakable pain and grief. But our loss will not be lessened by the state taking the life of another. As Coretta Scott King stated in explaining her opposition to the death penalty, “An evil deed is not redeemed by an evil deed of retaliation. Justice is never advanced in the taking of human life.”

Our opposition to the death penalty is deeply rooted in our religious faith, a faith that was central in James’ life as well. Our Savior Jesus Christ rejected the old way of an eye for an eye and taught us instead to tum the other cheek. He died that we might have everlasting life and, in doing so, asked that the lives of the two common criminals nailed to the crosses beside him be spared. We can do no less.

We also oppose the death penalty because it historically has been used in Mississippi and the South primarily against people of color for killing whites. Executing James’ killers will not help to balance the scales. But sparing them may help to spark a dialogue that one day will lead to the elimination of capital punishment.”

Read the full letter letter here: http://bit.ly/reqmtP

September 22, 2011 at 9:55 am
(13) Whitney says:

I respectfully disagree. For those truly seeking justice and not vengeance, 22+ years is enough. You’re right. I and many others protesting Troy Davis’ death have not experienced the murder of loved one. BUT Ms.Barbara Anderson Young the sister of James C. Anderson, a man brutally murdered by white teenagers because they wanted to hurt a black person, has.

Like the MacPhail family, the Anderson’s suffered the needless loss of good man who was someones father, partner, brother and uncle. Unlike the MacPhail, they are not willing to see the accused pay with their lives, despite SOLID evidence. His sister wrote to the district attorney asking him NOT to seek the death penalty for his murder. Here’s an excerpt:

“Those responsible for James’ death not only ended the life of a talented and wonderful man. They also have caused our family unspeakable pain and grief. But our loss will not be lessened by the state taking the life of another. As Coretta Scott King stated in explaining her opposition to the death penalty, “An evil deed is not redeemed by an evil deed of retaliation. Justice is never advanced in the taking of human life.”

Our opposition to the death penalty is deeply rooted in our religious faith, a faith that was central in James’ life as well. Our Savior Jesus Christ rejected the old way of an eye for an eye and taught us instead to tum the other cheek. He died that we might have everlasting life and, in doing so, asked that the lives of the two common criminals nailed to the crosses beside him be spared. We can do no less.
We also oppose the death penalty because it historically has been used in Mississippi and the South primarily against people of color for killing whites. Executing James’ killers will not help to balance the scales. But sparing them may help to spark a dialogue that one day will lead to the elimination of capital punishment.”

You can read the full letter by following the link: http://bit.ly/reqmtP

September 22, 2011 at 1:08 pm
(14) Vicki says:

I agree, Josh. However I don’t believe that seeing someone else put to death would make thing better for me either. Particularly if there is doubt as to his guilt.

September 22, 2011 at 12:18 am
(15) maria50 says:

Justice? u mean American corrupt red neck crap which is based on ignorance, narcism arrogance etc…….should i go on….i feel sorry for the officers family ….hate and distruction is dangerous path……betcha u all call urselves religious? suprise, ur not ur hypocrits…..

September 22, 2011 at 12:30 am
(16) The truth says:

He didn’t deserve to die, everyone knew he was innocent but that family was just trying to find someone to blame, and to anyone who disagrees and thinks he did it you are a complete moron. No one should die especially the innocent. I feel terrible that the family someone but even her son would have not wanted an innocent man to pay.

September 22, 2011 at 3:28 am
(17) Josh says:

“Everyone knew he was innocent” …?

Did you even read this article?

September 22, 2011 at 1:03 am
(18) BadgerBob says:

Fascinating to me how the right wing, which doesn’t trust government to get anything right, and especially distrusts lawyers and courts, puts all that aside when a person’s life is at stake. Dozens of Death Row convicts have been set free because DNA evidence not available during their trials has proven they weren’t guilty. Unfortunately for Troy Davis, the real killer didn’t leave DNA.

September 22, 2011 at 1:20 am
(19) r-i-p says:

This is terrible. Justice? Where is the justice now? ha!
As long as someone pays for a crime, whether he commits it or not, we call it justice? How can we call it justice if 7 out of 9 witnesses recanted? Nothing can make me change my mind. I believe that Troy Davis is 100% innocent.
To the people that wanted him to die, so much so that they reportedly “smiled” after he died, Troy wished them mercy, and prayed for their blessings. I believe it takes alot to do that for the people that desperately wanted him dead. Troy Davis’ blood is on the hands of the MacPhail family. I hope they are satisfied now that a man was murdered in light of so much doubt! This is cruelty at the very least. I am so disappointed.

September 22, 2011 at 3:30 am
(20) Josh says:

Why do you believe that their recantations are true?

September 22, 2011 at 6:44 pm
(21) Tubby says:

I agree with Josh. Why does everyone believe their recantations are true? The 7 witnesses have proven themselves to be liars. They are admitting they lied (I.e. committed perjury). One can call it “recanting,” but in the end which is it did they lie then or did they lie now?

September 23, 2011 at 8:37 am
(22) Tubby says:

Did you not read the above article you are commenting on? From what I can tell by reading the actual court report there were 34 witnesses not 9. So your statement is wrong.

What has led you to believe he is “100% innocent” (meaning he did nothing wrong and should not have even been in jail)? 7 proven liars (they committed perjury)? What about all the other evidence?

This case was not a traffic violation case. He’s was not convicted solely on, by what you are claiming above, 9 people’s testimony of which 7 people are now saying they lied.

Being able to debate an issue (without the threat of going to jail) is what makes America great, and I can appreciate your passion on this topic, but you are commenting on an article that seems to be a summary of the case not the “opinion” of a possibly biased writer. Assuming you read the article read it again (or better yet read his sources, he links to them) and point out the author’s inaccuracies.

September 22, 2011 at 1:32 am
(23) Wane says:

You can say what you want…until someone you love dies….than you will know what real justice is…..

September 22, 2011 at 2:23 am
(24) Alice says:

You’re right. If (God forbid) someone I love is murdered, I would want to murder the person responsible myself. I’m greatful I live in Australia where the justice system won’t let me turn myself into a cold-blooded murderer also, and will encourage me to live without blood on my hands.

September 22, 2011 at 2:40 am
(25) Rach says:

Well said Alice! I’m an Aussie too and I’m so thankful we don’t live in a country where people are murdered for their crimes. The majority of Americans call themselves Christians but isn’t “thou shalt not kill” the most important Biblical commandment? That goes for eye for an eye murder as well! Only forgiveness will give you peace, revenge will not.

September 22, 2011 at 2:40 am
(26) tfromdet says:

I have had a family member murdered, and causing his family pain wouldn’t bring my love one back or give me any joy. Luckily I live in an “non barbaric” state with no death penalty.

September 22, 2011 at 2:35 am
(27) Rach says:

“Justice”??? The USA is a lawless gun toting bible bashing outpost where people are murdered for their crimes.

September 22, 2011 at 6:44 pm
(28) billy878 says:

Rach then leave the USA please very fast and go live in an arab country where they cut your hand off if you steal. Please leave very fast planes going somewhere all the time.

September 22, 2011 at 5:08 am
(29) Elvis says:

The writer of this article is an ass hole

September 22, 2011 at 5:35 am
(30) Jim says:

Justice Served.

September 22, 2011 at 12:23 pm
(31) Racism says:

The only reason some people feel it’s justice beacause Troy Davis a BLACk man killed Officer Mark MacPhail a WHITE man. In the end it’s just racism and vengeance which is pathetic. Officer Mark MacPhail family was blinded by vengeance and not seeking justice. :(

September 22, 2011 at 12:46 pm
(32) Bill says:

The execution of Troy Davis, the murderous use of the death penalty and the probable racist overtones make it hard for me to NOT be ashamed to be an American. I reseached the trial and the suspicions many people have and there is something wrong with a country and its “so called” justice system that commits murder and says it’s justifiable. In the entire Western Hemisphere only the U.S. and Cuba have the Death Penalty as a possible penalty for crimes. It’s the 21st century, folks – - not the dark ages! Lets quit commiting murder and calling it justice !

September 22, 2011 at 2:36 pm
(33) Sarah says:

Weren’t the shell casings that were found by the police officer from the same gun that Mr. Davis had early used to shoot someone else? And he admitted he did ? Hmmm….perhaps food for thought? Just sayin’

September 22, 2011 at 2:49 pm
(34) E says:

Finally, an article in support of the victim. Good article, no one has outlined the details like this. Other ‘journalists’ parrot the talking points which this article refutes. I am sad for both families, too much waiting for both camps but if these fact and the games the defense played were more widely known, then maybe fewer people would be holding banners in support of this cop killer.

September 22, 2011 at 9:25 pm
(35) Jasmine M says:

Oh, you call this justice? Even it this had nothing to do with race and there was solid evidence proving Troy was guilty, how is going down to the level of a murder achieving ‘justice’.

Statistics show that this form of punishment doesn’t deter criminals, doesn’t create true closure for any parties involved (more so creates more psychological damage) and it’s not cost effective.

I of course understand that the victims family has been through heart break but I do lose some sympathy if they truly believe death for a death is a solution. But from some statements I’ve read, it appears the widow also understands the Davis family are going to be in pain now. It just goes to show it’s a lose-lose situation.

September 24, 2011 at 4:04 am
(36) Davd Mirenic says:

Speeding tickets don’t deter speeders and DUIs don’t deter drinkers; Should we abolish those too?

September 24, 2011 at 5:12 am
(37) Jasmine M says:

If we can find more effective means to deal with an issue, then yes. Remove the out of date method. The death penalty is out of date. We have to ability to ensure a bad person cannot go back into the community (generally, obviously, corruption in the system occurs). Times are different now. We are civilised in the Western world compared to our ancestors.

There’s a law in Australia to wear a helmet when riding a bike. Evidence shows these helmets don’t really do anything. It’s useless legislation providing law enforcement a few extra bucks via fines.

The difference with speeding/DUI’s is at least, it gives us grounds to remove their license and/or place other restrictions to prevent suffering to others. Then they have an opportunity to redeem themselves.

The death penalty gives no one wrongly convicted an opportunity to redeem themselves, and this is a basic human right. Sure, the real assholes likely abuse this but isn’t the most ethical approach, given that there has been a number of people executed later to be proven innocent, to abolish the death penalty? If you answer is ‘but they deserve it, even if a few innocent die and their families suffer’, aren’t you just being spiteful? It’s no longer about healing then, is it.

And even if the system could nail a criminal 100%, taking life and being the authority is not moral. Especially considering many countries will not allow someone that is terminally ill to choose when to end their lives while we put those on death row on suicide watch! If you going to be so strong about the law saying no abortions, no euthanasia because of a person’s ‘right to life’, that it can be no one else’s decision, you have to be the same for the flip side – a legal body, such as the State, cannot make the decision to take life.

I know I don’t know you position on abortion or euthanasia, but that is the bigger picture.

When you support the death penalty, are you truly after justice or revenge?

September 22, 2011 at 11:27 pm
(38) mitzu says:

may officer Macphail and his family have justice for his cold blooded murder 22 years ago, this man was convited of muder 20 some years ago and got to live in prison , see his family, and try to reverse his jury conviction by his peers.
did Marks family have the same NO his family was denied all his love and attention, I truly beleive Mark is the hero who came to the resucue of a innocent man who was being beated by a person who had no respect for anyones life and took the life of Mark and denied his family. Where were these pro life morons when Mark was murdered in cold blood on the street screaming for justice for him and his family.

September 23, 2011 at 1:42 am
(39) Jasmine M says:

When you say ‘pro life’ I hope you realise there’s a difference between pro lifers that are against abortion and people that think taking a person’s life away, bringing death as they did to someone else or others, just makes the State as disgusting as the criminal.

We’re not ‘pro lifers’ – we just campaign for what is moral and ethical.

What Mark did that night for the homeless person was of course, something we should applaud and remember him by. Remembering is act of kindness to me, keeps his memory alive and is true justice. A country having the power to cause death doesn’t.

September 23, 2011 at 8:34 am
(40) Michele Queyroy says:

Justice has not been served in the name of Mark!
One too many flaws in the initial report of Davis ‘crime. Please, do take time to read it again.
I am a pro Mark for his heroism.

September 23, 2011 at 12:11 pm
(41) wcss says:

If an innocent man/woman is/has been executed, has justice really been served? No, a great injustice has occurred; and that is not acceptable. (by the way, I am not a death penalty supporter)

September 23, 2011 at 3:34 pm
(42) justice says:

I only wish that what has happened will prevent someone else from doing what Davis done. The evidence was overwhelming.

September 24, 2011 at 3:07 pm
(43) shorty says:

Troy Davis was convicted and executed because a white police officer was killed and Troy Davis is black. This is south Ga. where even though racial discrimination is against the law it still exists. The murder happened at like one in the morning when it’s dark. Who gets a good description in the dark? I am saying Troy Davis lead an exemplary life. None of us do. We all have made and will make mistakes. But to kill an innocent man because he is black and the victim was a white cop? Get real. Troy’s execution was a hate crime. Yes the gun may have been his but who is to say he didn’t lend it to someone or it was stolen? Were Troy’s prints found on the gun? We all have a twin so the person who actually shot Officer MacPhail was built similiar to Troy.

September 27, 2011 at 1:12 am
(44) Adrian Zupp says:

This article was written by a man who is satisfied as long as somebody — anybody — pays the ultimate price. Apparently “justice” of this nature is to be inflicted without reserve unless it happens to come knocking on one’s own door. It would also seem that, for Mr. Montaldo, facts aren’t terribly important — as anyone who read this piece can see — as long as the blood lust is satisfied. The “author” has the hubris of the detached.

Two things I’d add: 1/ The case against Davis was so patently flawed that to even contemplate arguing that “they got the right guy” is tantamount to a resounding admission of mental deficiency; 2/ Even when someone IS guilty of a heinous crime, to plan and carry out their death in the name of “justice” demeans the humanity of us all and mimics the crimes we say we abhor.

Mr. Montaldo, your utter ineptitude vis-a-vis journalistic rigor makes it clear that you should save yourself further embarrassment by excusing yourself and never writing in a public forum again.

October 1, 2011 at 10:19 pm
(45) Jim Creamer says:

Charles Montaldo,

Have you ever been falsely convicted of a crime you didn’t commit? Have you ever been politically targeted because you said the wrong thing to someone in power who did commit a crime?

We live in one of the most corrupt countries in the world with the highest rate of imprisonment in the world. We have the world’s worst criminals like Bernie Madoff, who as head of the NASDAQ, had authoritative legitimacy while he stole $Billions. Likewise, our President has authorized the murder of a US Citizen without due process of law.

Troy Anthony Davis came from a good family and he voluntarily turned himself in. No good deed goes unpunished and Troy Anthony Davis paid for that good deed with his life.

Look, I understand you make a few extra bucks by writing for the NY Times owned by About.com Good for you! But is it really worth it considering all the pain and suffering you cause by spouting the “official racist party line of fry the little N, he deserves it.”

BTW Sylvester “Red” Coles has disappeared. Don’t you think in the name of justice the State of Georgia would want this guy to explain himself to prevent an innocent man being executed? It was Sylvester “Red” Coles who owned a gun of the same type that killed Officer MacPhail and he is he who fingered Troy Anthony Davis. Sylvester “Red” Coles wa a bad dude and obviously the most likely killer. Why not get the proof he didn’t do the crime since he was the obvious #1 suspect.

No the legal system is only concerned about perpetuating its own power, just as you are interested in getting paid by About.com You don’t get paid if you write stuff that runs counter to the editorial board of the NY Times – who condones Barack Obama’s ordering the murder of American citizens without due process of law.

October 23, 2011 at 9:07 pm
(46) Billy Fellow ARMY Brother says:

I read the trial transcripts and Before I read them I fell into the media spin thinking maybe they have it wrong and maybe they still do I don’t know I wasn’t there. There are 4 people who really know what happened Troy, Slyvester, Marck and are God. All will be dealt with , this I know. There are the victims of this horrible loss who deserve peace now Two people have been lost for this senesless crime and us the people left to debate this. We will never know the whole truth all we have is part truths and people looking out for there own best motives that were involved. What I do know is Two people are now gone, both loved by there respective familys. It is time to let them rest now.God is handeling the situation and he know’s the truth. Troy was there that night Slyvester was there (not disputed )and God Was There so if they got it wrong Troy is in a better place now and Slyvester will have to deal with Gods Hand next. Rest in piece Mark

August 29, 2012 at 5:56 am
(47) McGavin says:

SO MUCH BUTTHURT.

February 8, 2013 at 12:58 am
(48) Bill Clinton says:

Of course these murderers should be put to death. Anyone who believes otherwise is an idiot. Abortion? Who the hell brings that up? And liberals make me sick.

May 6, 2013 at 3:46 pm
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